Advertisement

Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on in vivo long-chain fatty acid oxidation in healthy adults

  • D.M. M[uuml ]ller
    Affiliations
    From the University of Leipzig, Children's Hospital; and the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Leipzig, Germany.
    Search for articles by this author
  • H. Seim
    Affiliations
    From the University of Leipzig, Children's Hospital; and the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Leipzig, Germany.
    Search for articles by this author
  • W. Kiess
    Affiliations
    From the University of Leipzig, Children's Hospital; and the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Leipzig, Germany.
    Search for articles by this author
  • H. L[ouml ]ster
    Affiliations
    From the University of Leipzig, Children's Hospital; and the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Leipzig, Germany.
    Search for articles by this author
  • T. Richter
    Affiliations
    From the University of Leipzig, Children's Hospital; and the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Leipzig, Germany.
    Search for articles by this author
      This paper is only available as a PDF. To read, Please Download here.

      Abstract

      Despite an abundance of literature describing the basic mechanisms of action of L-carnitine metabolism, there remains some uncertainty regarding the effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on in vivo fatty acid oxidation in normal subjects under normal conditions. It is well known that L-carnitine normalizes the metabolism of long-chain fatty acids in cases of carnitine deficiency. However, it has not yet been shown that L-carnitine influences the metabolism of long-chain fatty acids in subjects without disturbances in fatty acid metabolism. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on in vivo long-chain fatty acid oxidation by measuring 1-[13C] palmitic acid oxidation in healthy subjects before and after L-carnitine supplementation (3 [times ] 1 g/d for 10 days). We observed a significant increase in 13CO2 exhalation. This is the first investigation to conclusively demonstrate that oral L-carnitine supplementation results in an increase in long-chain fatty acid oxidation in vivo in subjects without L-carnitine deficiency or without prolonged fatty acid metabolism.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect