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Oxidation of combined ingestion of glucose and sucrose during exercise

      Abstract

      The first purpose of the study was to examine whether combined ingestion of glucose and sucrose at an intake rate of 1.2 g/min would lead to higher oxidation rates compared with the ingestion of an isocaloric amount of glucose or sucrose alone. The second aim of the study was to investigate whether a mixture of glucose and sucrose when ingested at a high rate (2.4 g/min) would result in exogenous CHO oxidation rates higher than 1.2 to 1.3 g/min.
      Eight trained cyclists (maximal oxygen consumption: 64 ± 2 mL · kg−1 · min−1, mean ± SE) performed 5 exercise trials in random order. Each trial consisted of 120 minutes of cycling at 50% maximum power output (63% ± 2% maximal oxygen consumption), whereas subjects received a solution providing either 1.2 g/min of glucose (GLU), 1.2 g/min of sucrose (SUC), 0.6 g/min of glucose + 0.6 g/min of sucrose (M–GLU+SUC), 1.2 g/min of glucose + 1.2 g/min of sucrose (H–GLU+SUC), or water (WAT).
      Peak exogenous CHO oxidation rates in the H–GLU+SUC trial (1.20 ± 0.07 g/min) were significantly higher (P < .01) compared with the GLU, M–GLU+SUC, and SUC trials (0.77 ± 0.04, 0.90 ± 0.07, 0.98 ± 0.04 g/min, respectively). Furthermore, peak exogenous CHO rates in M–GLU+SUC and SUC trials were significantly higher (P < .05) compared with the GLU trial.
      In conclusion, combined ingestion of moderate amounts of glucose and sucrose (144 g) during cycling exercise resulted in approximately 21% higher exogenous CHO oxidation rates compared with the ingestion of an isocaloric amount of glucose. Furthermore, when a mixture of glucose and sucrose was ingested at high rates (2.4 g/min), exogenous CHO oxidation rates reached peak values of approximately 1.20 g/min.
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