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Research Article| Volume 57, ISSUE 12, P1636-1644, December 2008

The effect of strawberries in a cholesterol-lowering dietary portfolio

  • David J.A. Jenkins
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 416 978 4752; fax: +1 416 978 5310.
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2

    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C4
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  • Tri H. Nguyen
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2
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  • Cyril W.C. Kendall
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2

    College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5C9
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  • Dorothea A. Faulkner
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2
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  • Balachandran Bashyam
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2
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  • In Joo Kim
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, Busan, 602-739 South Korea
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  • Chris Ireland
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2
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  • Darshna Patel
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2
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  • Edward Vidgen
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2
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  • Andrea R. Josse
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2
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  • Howard D. Sesso
    Affiliations
    Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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  • Britt Burton-Freeman
    Affiliations
    Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 60501, USA
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  • Robert G. Josse
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2

    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C4
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  • Lawrence A. Leiter
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2

    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C4
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  • William Singer
    Affiliations
    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C 2T2

    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C4
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      Abstract

      Effective diets reduce blood lipids and oxidative damage, both of which have been linked to the complications of diabetes and coronary heart disease. Our objective was to assess the effect of adding strawberries, as a source of antioxidants, to improve the antioxidant effect of a cholesterol-lowering diet (dietary portfolio). To this end, 28 hyperlipidemic subjects who had followed the dietary portfolio consisting of soy, viscous fiber, plant sterol, and nuts for a mean of 2.5 years were randomized to receive supplements of strawberries (454 g/d, 112 kcal) or additional oat bran bread (65 g/d, 112 kcal, ≈2 g β-glucan) (control) in a randomized 1-month crossover study with a 2-week washout. Strawberry supplementation resulted in a greater reduction in oxidative damage to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) measured as thiobarbituric acid–reactive substances in the LDL fraction (P = .014). At the end of the strawberry period, reductions in LDL cholesterol and in the ratio of total to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were maintained close to 1-year values at −13.4% ± 2.1% and −15.2% ± 1.7%, respectively (P < .001), and were similar to the post–oat bran bread values. Strawberries also improved the palatability of the diet. We conclude that strawberry supplementation reduced oxidative damage to LDL while maintaining reductions in blood lipids and enhancing diet palatability. Added fruit may improve the overall utility of diets designed to lower coronary heart disease risk.
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